This Institute program is being designed for maximum interaction through participatory research challenge discussions, presentations, projects, panels and cooperative or competitive research-focused activities. It also engages participants in informal settings and outdoor opportunities to encourage extended discourse among the participants.

Links soon will be provided below to updated papers on a password protected site so that all participants may read all submissions prior to the Institute. Open inks will not be provided until the book is published after the Institute.

At noted below, Wednesday afternoon is fully committed to informal activities within Acadia to ensure that early career and senior scholars have full opportunity to engage with each other while enjoying the natural environment. Evening opportunities are also planned. This is a serious academic conference yet we also plan to have lots of fun.

Early in the week, early career scholars will self select multi-disciplinary teams and have assigned appropriate senior scholar consultants in order to compete against each other in preparing proposals in response to a mock call for research proposals as was done at the previous institutes. A senior team will read the proposals, hear the oral presentations on Friday, select the winners and present awards.


Daily Schedule

This program is tentative and subject to changes and additions through proposed revisions by the participants.
Session Processes: See the current proposed processes for the panel discussions, paper presentation sessions and the Research Proposal Challenge.
Session Locations: Most sessions are scheduled for the Gates Center main hall at a single large U-shaped table with a screen for presentations as needed. All coffee breaks and meals are next door in the Blair Dining Room. All sessions after the afternoon coffee break will be in the First Floor of the Turrets Building.

Sunday 28 June
Time Session
2:00 pm Institute Registration & Check-In for On-Campus Accommodations
5:30 pm -6:30 pm Dinner (extra charge for off-campus participants)
Monday 29 June
Time Session Facilitators
7:30 am Registration – Blair Dining Room
7:30 am Breakfast
8:30 am Agenda Overview
KEYNOTE: Revisiting the Research Agendas of GIScience
Gilberto Câmara, INPE, Brazil
Moderators: Harlan Onsrud and Werner Kuhn
9:30 am Panel I - Contributions of GIScientists (or GIScience) Over the past 20 years
Speakers:
Max Egenhofer, University of Maine
Keith Clarke, UC Santa Barbara
Moderator: David Coleman, University of New Brunswick
Early Career Panelist: Song Gao, UC Santa Barbara
Early Career Panelist: Teriitutea Quesnot
Snr Schl Panelist: Randolph Franklin, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Snr Schlr Panelist: May Yuan, University of Texas at Dallas
10:30 am Coffee Break
11:00 am Panel 2 - Most Significant Technological & Societal Influences on GIScience Over past 20 yrs
Speakers:
Xavier Lopez, Oracle
Francis Harvey, University of Leipzig, Germany
Moderator: Stephan Winter, University of Melbourne, Australia
Early Career Panelist: Benjamin D. Hennig
Early Career Panelist: Myeong-Hun Jeong
Snr Schl Panelist: Tim Trainor, Census Bureau
Snr Schlr Panelist: Sabine Timpf, University of Augsburg, Germany
Noon Lunch
1:00 pm Paper Session 1 - Semantics and Reasoning
Torsten Hahmann, Semantic Challenges for Geographic and Spatial Reasoning (Extended Abstract)
Matthew Dube, Beyond Homeomorphic Deformations: Neighborhoods of Topological Changes (Full Paper)
Kevin Cui, Ontology-based Geo-spatial Knowledge Reasoning System (Extended Abstract)
Moderator: Helen Couclelis, UC-Santa Barbara
Discussant 1: Randolph Franklin, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Discussant 2: Yingjie Hu, UC Sanata Barbara
2:00 pm Paper Session II - Spatial Relations and Properties
Maria Vasardani and Stephan Winter, Place Properties (Full Paper)
Stacy Doore, Spatial preposition specification for improved small scale indoor navigation (Extended Abstract)
Joshua A. Lewis, Spatial Scene Representation: A Survey and Categorization (Full Paper)
Moderator: Keith Clarke, UC-Santa Barbara
Discussant 1: Jayant Sharma, Oracle
Discussant 2: Vít Voženílek, Palacký University, Czech Republic
3:30 pm Coffee Break
4:00 pm Introducing Research Proposal Process
Mock NSF Proposal Solicitation
Mock NIH Proposal Solicitation
Moderators: Harlan and Werner
Discussant 1: Kate Beard, University of Maine
Discussant 2: Ling Bian, University at Buffalo
5:30 pm Dinner (extra charge for off-campus participants)
Tuesday 30 June
Time Session Facilitators
7:30 am Breakfast
8:30 am Panel 3 - Emerging Technological Challenges Likely to Affect GIScience in the Next 20 Years
Speakers:
Michael Gould, Esri and Univ Jaume I, Spain
Lars Bodum, Aalborg University, Denmark
Moderator: Silvia Nittel, University of Maine
Early Career Panelist: Paulo Raposo
Early Career Panelist: Maria Vasardani, University of Melbourne
Snr Schlr Panelist: Jayant Sharma, Oracle
Snr Schlr Panelist: Keith Clarke, UC-Santa Barbara
9:30 am Paper Session III - Network and Probabilistic Approaches
Ling Bian, Spatial networks in epidemiological studies (Extended Abstract)
Song Gao, Spatiotemporal Autocorrelation Analysis for Pattern Recognition on Geospatial Big Data (Extended Abstract)
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Moderator: David Coleman, University of New Brunswick
Discussant 1: Terje Midtbø, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Discussant 2: Su Jin Lee, University of Southern California
10:30 am Coffee Break
11:00 am Panel 4 - Emerging Societal Challenges Likely to Affect GIScience in the Next Twenty Years
Speakers:
Helen Couclelis, UC-Santa Barbara
Terje Midtbø, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Moderator: Laxmi Ramasubramanian, Hunter College, CUNY
Early Career Panelist: Jeon-Young Kang
Early Career Panelist: James Campbell, University of Maine
Snr Schlr Panelist: Stéphane Roche, Laval University
Snr Schlr Panelist: Aileen Buckley, Esri
Noon Lunch
1:00 pm Paper Session IV - Feature Detection and Digital Mapping
Paulo Raposo, Geomorphological delineation using computer vision to support automated mapping (Extended Abstract)
Myeong-Hun Jeong, Shaowen Wang and Clair Julia Sullivan, Analysis of dynamic radiation level changes using surface networks (Full Paper)
Eric Shook, Parallel Cartographic Modeling (Extended Abstract)
Moderator: Sean Ahearn, Hunter College, CUNY
Discussant 1: Lucia Lovison-Golob, Afriterra Foundation
Discussant 2: Kejin Cui, University at Buffalo
2:00 pm Paper Session V - Movement and Change
Somayeh Dodge, From Observation to Prediction: The Trajectory of Movement Research in GIScience (Full Paper)
Jeon-Young Kang, Jinmu Choi and Thomas Bittner, An Ontology-based Geospatial Database for Indentifying Geographical Change (Extended Abstract)
Shiran Zhong and Ling Bian, From Infection Cases to Infection Tree (Extended Abstract)
Moderator: May Yuan, University of Texas at Dallas
Discussant 1: Tim Trainor, Census Bureau
Discussant 2: Stephan Winter, University of Melbourne, Australia
3:30 pm Coffee Break
4:00 pm Self-Organizing Research Group Process Moderators: Werner and Harlan
5:30 pm Dinner (extra charge for off-campus participants)
Wednesday 1 July
Time Session Facilitators
7:30 am Breakfast
8:30 am Paper Session VI - Geo-ontologies for Linked Data
Andrea Ballatore, Prolegomena for an Ontology of Place (Full Paper)
Yingjie Hu, Enriching top-down geo-ontologies using bottom-up knowledge mined from Linked Open Data (Full Paper)
Teriitutea Quesnot, Linked Landmark Data: Toward the Automatic Detection of Landmarks on the Web of Data (Full Paper)
Moderator: Jayant Sharma, Oracle
Discussant 1: Kate Beard, University of Maine
Discussant 2: Eric Shook, Kent State University
9:30 am Paper Session VII - Management Research
Elisabeth Häggquist, The Adoption of Geological Information in the Public Sector: A Joint Estimation with Related Information (Full Paper)
Jochen Albrecht, Towards a Theory of GIS Program Management (Full Paper)
Laxmi Ramasubramanian, Using Geo-Spatial Knowledge for Good Governance (Extended Abstract)
Moderator: Ling Bian, University at Buffalo
Discussant 1: Sabine Timpf, University of Augsburg, Germany
Discussant 2: Matthew Dube, University of Maine
10:30 am Coffee Break
11:00 am Team Proposal Writing
Noon Lunch (Bag lunches available)
1:00 pm Afternoon for Group Social Activities (e.g. hiking, biking, swimming, whale watch, etc.)
2:00 pm Group Social Activities
3:30 pm Group Social Activities
4:00 pm Group Social Activities
5:30 pm Dinner (extra charge for off-campus participants)
Thursday 2 July
Time Session Facilitators
7:30 am Breakfast
8:30 am Paper Session VIII - Rethinking Principles and Approaches
Benjamin D. Hennig, Mapping practices in a digital world (Full Paper)
Sean Ahearn, Ilknur Icke and André Skupin, From Bo[o]k to Base-Map: Managing Domain Knowledge through Collaboration and Computation (Full Paper)
• Steffen Pøhner Henriksen and Terje Midtbø, Map related experiments by the use of Oculus Rift - can low cost VR technology provide sufficient realism? (Full Paper)
Moderator: Stéphane Roche, Laval University
Discussant 1: Laxmi Ramasubramanian, Hunter College, CUNY
Discussant 2: Francis Harvey, University of Leipzig, Germany
9:30 am Team Proposal Writing
10:30 am Coffee Break
11:00 am Paper Session IX - Data and Services
Indy Hurt, Spatial Data and Map Service Development: Mirroring the Path of a Discipline (Extended Abstract)
Francis Harvey, Making GIS fit for use in the era of ubiquitous computing (Extended Abstract)
James Campbell, Copyright and Alternatives in Access to Scientific Information (Full Paper)
Moderator: Xavier Lopez, Oracle
Discussant 1: Aileen Buckley, Esri
Discussant 2: David Mark, University at Buffalo
Noon Lunch
1:00 pm Team Proposal Writing
2:00 pm Team Proposal Writing
3:30 pm Coffee Break
4:00 pm Team Proposal Writing
Proposal Due Electronically at 5:00 pm

5:30 pm Institute Dinner – lobster, et. al.
Friday 3 July
Time Session Facilitators
7:30 am Breakfast
8:30 am Potential Featured Speaker
9:30 am Paper Session X – Resource Tracking and Management
Lars Bodum, Developments Within Geospatial Technologies for the Support of Urban Sustainability Towards Smart Cities (Extended Abstract)
Lucia Lovison-Golob, Geospatial Resource Management in Areas Stricken by Disasters in Chile: A GEOSS Approach (Extended Abstract)
Su Jin Lee, Effects of Increasing Home Size on Green Cover in Los Angeles County’s Single Family Neighborhoods (Extended Abstract)
Moderator: Michael Gould, Esri and Univ Jaume I, Spain
Discussant 1: Jochen Albrecht, Hunter College, CUNY
Discussant 2: Somayeh Dodge, University of Colorado
10:30 am Coffee Break
11:00 am Oral Presentations of Proposals Review Panel
Noon Lunch
1:00 pm Oral Presentations of Proposals Review Panel
2:00 pm Review Panel Deliberations
3:30 pm Coffee Break
4:00 pm Award Ceremony and Prizes
5:30 pm Dinner (extra charge for off-campus participants)

1. Proposed Process for Panel Discussions (assumes one hour sessions)

a. The panel sessions will be bunched near the beginning of the Institute to serve as context for the Proposal Writing Challenge teams later in the week.
b. Topics: Four panel sessions will address the following topics:
     Panel 1. Most Significant Contributions of GIScientists (or GIScience) Over the past 20 years
     Panel 2. Most Significant Technological and Societal Influences on GIScience Over the past 20 years
     Panel 3. Emerging Technological Challenges Likely to Affect GIScience in the Next Twenty Years
     Panel 4. Emerging Societal Challenges Likely to Affect GIScience in the Next Twenty Years
c. Invited Speakers: Each panel session will begin typically with two twelve-minute invited presentations with those speakers giving their perspectives on the panel session topic. Slides or a summary should be provided to the other panelists at least 24 hours in advance.
d. Panelists: There will be two Early Career Panelists and two Senior Scholar Panelists. Panelists will each have three to five minutes total to respond to the two invited presentations by adding additional perspectives or critiquing/supporting the other perspectives presented.
e. Audience Participation: The moderator will open the discussion to the entire audience, ask the presenters to respond to the discussants, and/or the moderator will be prepared to raise his or her own further questions or perspectives. (15 minutes)
f. Panel Report: Thus a panel typically consists of a moderator, two invited speakers, two early career panelists and two senior scholar panelists. The seven people involved in each panel session will be asked to take the notes from the session and construct a co-authored short summary (5 to 10 pages) to serve as a chapter in the book.

2. Proposed Process for Short Paper Presentation Sessions (assumes one hour sessions)

a. Each paper session typically lasts for one hour with a total of three papers in the session. Papers in these sessions are typically presented by Early Career Scholars but not always.
b. Short Presentations: A timer will be set for each presentation. Slides are not necessary (and even discouraged) but may be used if loaded in advance. Each accepted presenter will be seated at a table on stage and have 12 minutes to present key ideas from their submission. Audience members will be asked to write down and save their questions for the Audience Participation Session.
c. Discussants: Senior Scholar Discussant 1 who has previously read the submissions will have five minutes to critique or address issues raised in all three of the presentations. No slides allowed. Senior Scholar Discussant 2 will have five minutes to do the same.
d. Audience Participation: The moderator will open the discussion to the entire audience, ask the presenters to respond to the discussants, and/or the moderator will raise his or her own further questions or perspectives.

3. Proposed Process for the Research Challenge Proposal Sessions

a. In the opening session of the Institute, early career scholars will be challenged to start thinking about potential topics for full development through a research proposal.
b. On Monday afternoon, a session will be held to go over the mock NSF Solicitation. Two senior discussants with successful funding track records will present their ideas on critical issues and practical advice to keep in mind when writing proposals for funding.
c. On Tuesday afternoon, early career scholars will self-select multi-disciplinary teams for each team to develop a research proposal.
Suggested Self-Selection Process
     • Early career scholars (ECSs) are forewarned that on Tuesday afternoon they will be requested to come up with at least one idea for a funded research project/proposal.
     • In a session of ECSs with a facilitator, each ECS writes down their broad or specific idea for a research proposal. They place it on a full size sticky sheet of paper without their name. Each ECS can post up to three initial ideas.
     • Ideas are posted on a wall and the facilitator perhaps groups them a bit, numbers them and then asks each proponent to give an oral pitch on one of their idea(s) and keep going around until all posted topics have had a pitch.
     •Each person writes their first name on a yellow sticky and votes on the topic they would most like to pursue with others by placing their sticky on the topic. No more than five names may be attached to a topic. Topics with no votes are pulled from the wall. No general topic may have fewer than three participants. The process continues until the maximum and minimum criteria are met.
d. Senior Scholar mentors are invited by a writing team to serve as a mentor or are assigned to each team based on the chosen topics.
e. One hour of team proposal writing on Wednesday and 4.5 hours on Thursday with proposal due at 5:00 pm.
f. Team oral presentations at 11:00 and 1:00 on Friday with critiques, questions and ratings completed by the Panel by 3:30.
g. Awarding of Prizes late Friday afternoon.